Halogen light bulb ban in effect across Europe

It is no longer legal to produce or import non-directional halogen light bulbs to the European market, as of 1 September.

Technological development to combat climate change is leading to a number of forced product changes, and the phasing out of halogen bulbs in Europe is just one example. Manufacturers need guidance in this scenario, to keep updated in all aspects of product design.

 

Nemko testing capabilities

Nemko has a wide scope of testing capabilities for light, including testing of LED products (IEC 62031, IEC 62471 series), control gear and transformers. Nemko testing services include safety, EMC, performance, environmental and energy efficiency and quality assessment of the manufacturers’ premises. Nemko has updated knowledge on certification requirements and legislations worldwide.

Currently, European shops may sell out their stock of halogen light bulbs, but not import new ones. Replacement lamps for phased-out halogen would be some low voltage halogen lamps of class B, CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) and LEDs. Some special purpose lamps, such as those used in extra low or high temperatures (e.g. freezers and ovens) are exempt from the ban.

 

Benefits of LED technology

LED technology (light-emitting diodes) has many significant advantages over halogen lamps. The lifespan of a halogen bulb is approximately 1000 hours, while a comparable LED light would last more than 25,000 hours. The most efficient LEDs today use 10% of the average halogen lamp. Buying LED lights will save consumers money in the long run due to both lower electricity bills and a longer lifespan, even though the initial cost might be higher.

As the markets in Europe are switching to LED lights, the environmental impact from illumination is rapidly declining from today’s 14% of total European electricity consumption.

The halogen ban is an important contributor to the European goals of reducing CO2 emissions.

The process of sequentially banning the least efficient light sources in Europe started in 2009, when frosted and high power consuming incandescent light bulbs were taken out of the market. The current halogen ban is the sixth stage in this regulatory process.

 

 

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